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Nerrrrd

First blogiversary!

I realized the other day my blog is just over a year old. My very first post was a Play framework tip that took two whole sentences to explain. Since then I’ve published 71 more posts, go me! Turns out one or two posts a week over a year really adds up.

What I’ve learned from my year of blogging is that building a habit is way more important to blogging regularly than motivation is. Some weeks I really do not want to write a post, but I do it anyway because breaking the habit bugs me more than sucking it up and writing the damned post :) Seriously, if I waited until inspiration struck to write a post there would be less than a dozen of them on this blog.

Not that you shouldn’t take advantage of motivation when you have it! The big thing that helped me finally start this blog after ages of thinking I should really start blogging was starting a new job and learning all sorts of cool stuff I wanted to a) share, and b) make sure I didn’t forget. Writing things down helps me remember them, and even if I forget stuff I’ve blogged about, I know where to look for it.

Another thing I’ve learned is that explaining something is a great way to learn it. I hope my series of posts about SOLID design principles were useful to other people, but I probably learned more writing them than any of my readers did. You may think you understand something after you’ve read a few posts about it, but there’s nothing like trying to write your own explanation of it to show you where the gaps are in your understanding.

Over the last year my most popular post was Showing up is my secret superpower. It’s really cool that people liked something I wrote enough to share it. Sometimes stuff you throw out there because you don’t know what to write about really clicks with people.

Stay tuned, I’m planning for many more blogiversarys!

Rubber duck debugging

Rubber duck debugging is one of those things that sounds completely ridiculous and is actually really helpful. To summarize the wikipedia page quickly, rubber duck debugging is when you figure out what’s wrong with your code by explaining it very carefully to an inanimate object.

You’re probably wondering why you would bother explaining your code to an object like a rubber duck or a teddy bear if you work as part of a team and you could just ask one of the other devs for help. Sometimes you should go directly to another developer. If there’s a serious bug in production that affects a lot of users, worrying about interrupting someone would be silly, it’s much more important to get production working again than to let Hypothetical Amy finish off her refactoring task before you bother her.

In other situations, it’s more important to give it a try yourself before interrupting anyone. The reason interruptions are such a big deal is that context switching is expensive and it’s even worse when switching to a programming task because of the number of details programmers have to “reload” into their working memory before they can get back into their work. Numbers on exactly how long it takes to get back up to speed after you’ve been interrupted vary, this Fast Company article says it takes a little over 23 minutes to get back on task but this New York Times article says it’s more like 25 minutes. If you ask someone to help you for just five minutes, it’s really not just five minutes, it’s also the time it takes for them to get back into what they were doing. That’s why programmers tend to get so cranky when you interrupt them :)

One way you can try to solve your own problem without interrupting anyone is rubber duck debugging. Having to explain all of the context around your problem, like what you’re trying to accomplish, what your code is supposed to do to get to that end result, what seems to be going wrong, where you think the problem is, what you’ve already tried, etc is one of the most useful parts of asking another person for help, and often the only part you need to solve your problem. Something about the process of explaining a problem to someone else helps you see parts that you missed before, whether it’s a log file you didn’t check or a logic error you didn’t catch. That explaining process doesn’t actually require a person to explain things to, it can work just as well if you explain it to the rubber duck, or the teddy bear, or a voice recording app on your phone or whatever works for you.

Personally, I like to write an email to the person I would ask for help if I really couldn’t figure it out myself. Putting a name at the top seems to help me get into the mindset of thinking about what that person would ask me about the problem and what they would likely suggest I try next. Most of the time I figure it out before I finish the email, but when I don’t, hey, I already have a nice tidy explanation of the problem that I can send to the person I would’ve asked for help anyway :)

If you’re stuck and don’t have anyone around to ask or just want to try everything you can before you ask for help, give rubber duck debugging a try. The worst case scenario is you end up with a good description of your problem that you could send to a friend of post in a forum.

Productivity is overrated

A little while ago I posted a productivity tip and immediately started worrying that I sounded like one of those awful productivity gurus who preach maximum productivity all day every day what do you mean leisure has value?

I want to be very clear here: my worth as a human being is not measured by how much stuff I get done and neither is yours. My sole interest in productivity is breaking the shame spiral.

The shame spiral I’m talking about is the horrible feedback loop where you procrastinate, feel ashamed of not getting enough done, procrastinate more because you associate the work with shame, feeling more ashamed because you’re still not getting anything done and on and on. I don’t want you to be the perfect [insert work here]-producing machine, I want you to be happy and to feel good about what you’ve done at the end of the day. In fact, I actively want you to not be a perfect work-producing machine because that’s no way to live. If you don’t enjoy your life and have time for friends and family (chosen or assigned) and hobbies it doesn’t matter how much you get done.

You will never ever hear productivity tips from me about shit like how much work you can get done if you start waking up at 5 am or how you should listen to professional development audiobooks on your commute. You are allowed to listen to music and relax on your way to work. You do not have to cram something useful into every minute of every day.

A question I hardly ever see anyone ask in articles or blog posts about productivity is why you want to be more productive. Everyone just assumes that getting more done must automatically be a good thing. Getting stuff done is a great feeling if it’s something important to you and you’re not pushing yourself into burnout, but you know what else is great? Downtime. Playing a boardgame with your friends or trying out a new restaurant or going for a walk or reading a novel.

Personally, I do feel unfulfilled if I do nothing but play computer games when I come home from work for too many days in a row. I like the sense of accomplishment that comes from making progress on personal projects. But just like computer games can’t be my whole life, neither can work. That’s just not healthy and that lack of perspective leads to shitty work anyway.

Before you look at a productivity tip, ask yourself why you want to get more done. If you have a project that you want to finish, great! But if you feel guilty if you’re not doing something useful every minute of every day or you don’t want your parents to be disappointed in you or you feel like you’ll be left behind if you don’t spend every minute working, you officially have my permission to say “Fuck it, I’m going to go play videogames.” Don’t be productive for the sake of being productive, do stuff that’s either personally meaningful to you or fun.

 

Showing up is my secret superpower

Or, networking for misanthropic nerds.

I’m shy, awkward around people I don’t know well, and honestly kind of a dork. So how is that I got three of the four jobs I’ve had since college by knowing people? I show up. That’s seriously it. Physically show up to events, make a minimal effort to be friendly, and you will get to know people who will either introduce you to someone who will offer you a job or offer you a job directly.

So let’s get into details. When I say “events” what am I actually talking about? User groups, code camps, meetups, developer get-togethers, conferences, etc. Victoria is not a large city and we still have a wealth of meetups, your city almost certainly has some too. Google is your friend here, as is twitter and other social media. I found out about whiskydev because a friend tweeted about it. At whiskydev I met a friend who introduced me to my new boss, and now I work at an awesome startup.

If you’re particularly shy, I recommend user groups or meetups where someone gives a talk. How do you know the group is having someone give a talk? They’ll usually announce the speaker and topic ahead of time because they’re excited about having an actual speaker (depending on the group’s topic, it can be a huge pain to find someone to speak so organizers are usually pretty stoked about finding someone) and so that people who either don’t care about or love that topic can make plans accordingly. Talks are easier for shy people because a) you can spend most of your time at the meeting quietly taking notes, and b) afterwards you can ask people how they liked the talk instead of agonizing over how to start a conversation. Not that I’ve ever done that.

Another tip for shy people or for people who are really serious about networking is to volunteer. I volunteer with a number of organizations and I speak from experience when I say there is no such thing as too many volunteers. Come early and help set up, stay late and help clean up, or ask the organizers if they need volunteers for anything. The answer will almost certainly be yes, and now you’ll have a defined job to do which makes it way easier to talk to people.

It’s great if you can be friendly and talk to people, but the first step is just physically showing up. Start there and you’ll be fine.

But to be fair, I have to mention that it is possible for showing up to backfire horribly. If you show up and act like an asshole, word will spread. Victoria in particular is a very small town when it comes to tech. The person you’re a jerk to today could easily be friends with the team lead who’ll be interviewing you tomorrow. On the upside, you kind of have to work at it to be enough of a jerk that someone would tell a friend not to hire you. People are generally pretty forgiving and we all know what it’s like to put our foot in our mouths. Just don’t be a dick and you’ll be fine. That doesn’t mean you can’t have opinions, just that you should phrase them as opinions. For example “I hate working with javascript” is just an opinion, but “javascript sucks and only shitty programmers use it” is going to make you look like a jerk.

And one more tip, particularly for students: class counts as networking. Your professors have probably had students before you, and certainly know people in the industry. Those former students may be the ones interviewing you or asking your professor about you. People your former classmates work with might also ask them what you were like as a classmate. Think about what you want them to say before you show up late and blow off assignments. This applies to your current job as well – just like you aren’t going to stay in one place for your entire career, neither are your coworkers. If you interview somewhere a former coworker now works, what are they going to say about you if the interviewer asks them?

To summarize, my tips for networking are:

  1. Show up
    1. Try to be friendly
  2. Don’t be a dick
  3. For extra credit, volunteer

That’s all you need to do to make contacts who might one day help you find a job. “Networking” can sound like something only slimy salesdroids do, but it’s really just showing up and trying to be friendly.